Professor Bruner presents at Law, Finance and Sustainability conference at University of Sheffield, England

Christopher Bruner, J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law at the University of Georgia School of Law, took part on Monday at a global conference on “Law, Finance & Sustainability” in Sheffield, England.

Hosted by the Institute of Corporate and Commercial Law at the University of Sheffield, and cosponsored by the Sustainable Market Actors for Responsible Trade (SMART) initiative at the University of Oslo, Norway, the event brought together an international group of scholars and practitioners to discuss financial dimensions of corporate sustainability.

Professor Bruner’s scholarship scholarship focuses on corporate, securities and financial law, including international and comparative dimensions. At the Sheffield conference, he presented a working paper titled “Corporate Governance Reform in Post-Crisis Financial Firms: Two Fundamental Tensions.”

Introducing our LL.M. Class of 2018

from left: top, Lera Subocheva, Ahmed Youssef, Jessica Perez Salazar, Parham Zahedi, Chudi Ofili, Shah Hussain, Pierre Laforet; middle, Adriana Maria Sarria Mena, Samaneh Pourhassan, Shruthi Bangalore Rajakumar, Marie Belgioino, Haibin Wang; front, Chioma Ogbozor, Thelma Aguilar-Pierce, Jasmine Zou, Chen Song

We are proud to introduce the University of Georgia School of Law Master of Laws (LL.M.) Class of 2018.

The group of 16 includes lawyers from 10 different countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas: China, Colombia, Egypt, France, India, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, and Russian Federation.

They join a tradition that began at the University of Georgia School of Law in the early 1970s, when a Belgian lawyer became the first foreign-trained practitioner to earn a Georgia Law LL.M. degree. In the ensuing four decades, the law school and its Dean Rusk International Law Center have produced about 500 LL.M. graduates, with ties to 75 countries and every continent in the world.

Side by side with J.D. candidates, LL.M.s follow a flexible curriculum tailored to their own career goals – goals that may include preparation to sit for a U.S. bar examination, or pursuit of a concentration affording advancement in their home country’s legal profession or academic institutions.

For information or to apply for LL.M. studies, see here.

“The Next Generation of International Trade Agreements”: September 18 Georgia Law conference to feature trade law scholars, practitioners

Eugene Talmadge Memorial Bridge over the Savannah River, at the Port of Savannah, Georgia, the largest single container terminal in the United States. Photo (1998) by Jonas N. Jordan, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

“The Next Generation of International Trade Agreements” is the timely title of this year’s annual conference organized by the Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law and Dean Rusk International Law Center, University of Georgia School of Law. Set for Monday, September 18, 2017, the daylong conference will celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Center.

Scholars and practitioners from North America and Europe will come together to discuss one of the most pressing topics in today’s international arena. Panels, which will follow introductory remarks by Georgia Law Dean Peter B. “Bo” Rutledge and Center Director Kathleen A. Doty, are as follows:

Setting the Negotiating Agenda: C. Donald Johnson (Georgia Law JD’73), Emeritus Director of the Dean Rusk International Law Center and former U.S. Ambassador, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative; Professor Kathleen Claussen, Miami Law; Nicolas Lamp, Professor at Queen’s University Law, Canada, and former Dispute Settlement Lawyer, Appellate Body Secretariat, World Trade Organization; and Professor Timothy Meyer, Vanderbilt Law.

Changing Dynamics in Global Trade Negotiations: Professor Gregory Shaffer, California-Irvine Law; Professor Mark Wu, Harvard Law; and Professor Padideh Ala’i, American University Law. Moderating will be Tina Termei (Georgia Law JD’10), Corporate Counsel for Global Trade at Amazon.

Industry Roundtable Luncheon Conversation: Ling-Ling Nie, Chief Compliance Officer & Assistant General Counsel, Panasonic North America; Stewart Moran, Assistant General Counsel, Carter’s | OshKosh B’gosh; and Travis Cresswell, Senior Managing Counsel, The Coca-Cola Co.

Pluralism/Regionalism/Fragmentation: Professor Antonia Eliason, Mississippi Law; Professor Markus Wagner, Warwick Law, England; and Professor Robert Howse, New York University Law. Moderating will be Harlan G. Cohen, Gabriel M. Wilner/UGA Foundation Professor in International Law and Faculty Co-Director, Dean Rusk International Law Center, University of Georgia School of Law.

Delivering closing remarks will be Victoria A. Barker, Editor-in-Chief of the Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law. Additional speakers are invited but not yet confirmed: invited: Terry Smith Labat (Georgia Law JD’77), U.S. Department of Commerce; Audrey Winter (Georgia Law JD’80), Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for China, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative; and Professor Saxby Chambliss, Sanders Political Leadership Scholar at Georgia Law, partner at DLA Piper, and former U.S. Senator.

Issues these experts will explore include, as described in the concept note:

“International trade law is at inflection point. Until quite recently, international trade agreements appeared to be moving along a relatively predictable trajectory. Reforms and changes were discussed and negotiated, but mostly along the margins of a supposed consensus about the general direction of the field. Political events of the past year, though – Brexit, the United States’ abandonment of TPP, calls to renegotiate NAFTA, accelerating negotiations of RCEP, and China’s roll out of its One Belt One Road initiative, among others – have challenged that trajectory and sent policymakers and trade lawyers in search of a new trade compass. A new period of negotiation and renegotiation, however, is on the horizon. While this is a source for many of anxiety, it is also an opportunity for progress, reform, and creative thinking. This conference will bring together top scholars and practitioners in the field to discuss the directions forward for international agreements. What should be on the table as old agreements are reopened and new ones are negotiated? What changes are needed to adapt trade agreements to new economic and technological realities? And how can the next generation of trade agreements respond to globalization’s discontents?”

Cosponsoring the conference are the law school’s Business Law Society, Corsair Law Society, and International Law Society, along with the University of Georgia School of Public & International Affairs.

Details and registration here for the conference, for which CLE credit is available.

Professor Cohen explores American international law and legal realism

Harlan Grant Cohen, the Gabriel M. Wilner/UGA Foundation Professor in International Law and Faculty Co-Director of our Dean Rusk International Law Center at the University of Georgia School of Law, has posted a chapter entitled “Are We (Americans) All International Legal Realists Now?,” which will appear in the forthcoming Cambridge University Press volume Concepts on International Law in Europe and the United States, edited by Chiara Giorgetti and Guglielmo Verdirame.

The manuscript, which forms part of our Dean Rusk International Law Center Research Paper Series at SSRN, may be downloaded at this SSRN link.

Here’s the abstract:

“Is American international law distinctly legal realist? The claim is often made, but underexplored. What would it mean for American international law scholarship and practice to be legal realist in its orientation? Where would such an orientation come from, and what do those origin stories mean for current international law work? Are there common realist-inspired approaches within the varied schools of American international law scholarship? Does wielding those approaches produce distinctly American views on international law doctrine, its operation, or its function? And if American international law scholarship and practice is, in these ways, somewhat distinct, what does it mean for the broader, global project of international law?

“This chapter takes the claim seriously and explores the ways in which American international law may in fact be tinged with legal realism. It explores how a number of intellectual trends—American jurisprudential legal realism, post-World War II international relations scholarship, utopian strands in American foreign policy thinking, and U.S.-specific foreign relations law—converged to bring a series of specific methods or attitudes to the forefront in American approaches international law. Perhaps provocatively, this chapter argues that all the major schools of American international law—New Haven, International Legal Process, Transnational Legal Process, Law and Economics, International Relations and International Law, and others—have picked up these methods, attitudes, or approaches—enough to warrant labeling all of them as essentially ‘legal realist.’

“And it explores how legal realism translates into four noticeable trends in American approaches to international law:

(1) a focus on norms rather than rules,

(2) a focus on process rather than doctrine,

(3) a focus on institutions and power rather than substantive rules, and

(4) an emphasis on pragmatism and practicality.”

Law Hawk rules at Georgia Law

Morning here at Dean Rusk Hall began with some spectacular swoops by Law Hawk.

For years, Law Hawk has stood guard at the University of Georgia School of Law. Seeing her is a good and awesome omen. As reported in 2012 by Red & Black, the university’s student newspaper:

“Law Hawk has unofficially been identified as a female, broad-winged hawk that spends most of her days perched in the dogwood trees outside the Law Library window on North Campus.”

This morning she explored the law school’s Dean Rusk Hall. The video above, by Administrative Assistant Nikki Clarke, finds Law Hawk first on a railing outside, then in full-wingspan flight. Moments later, she rose from the ivy grounds, startling an unsuspecting passerby.

Law Hawk’s appearances have generated her own Facebook page, plus a fearsome catchphrase:

“Ever vigilant. Never reckless. Always deadly.”

Oh, and did we mention our owl?

Visiting Scholar Yanying Zhang, law professor at Shandong University

Yanying Zhang, a widely published legal scholar from China, is now in residence as the 2017-18 Visiting Scholar here at the Dean Rusk International Law Center, University of Georgia School of Law. She joins us from China’s Shandong University of Finance and Economics, where she serves as Professor of Law, Graduate Supervisor, Director of the Comparative Law Research Center, and Vice Dean of the Economic and Trade Law Department.

Professor Zhang will continue her research on Land Takings from the Perspective of Remedy: Problems Inspection and Systems Innovation, funded by a grant from the Ministry of Education of China. Professor Christian Turner will serve as her Georgia Law faculty sponsor.

Her visit continues our Center’s long tradition of hosting, for brief or extended stays, scholars and researchers whose work touches on issues of international, comparative, or transnational law. Details and an online application to become a visiting scholar here.

Professor Zhang earned her doctorate in comparative law from China University of Political Science and Law, her master’s degree in law from Renmin University of China, and her bachelor’s degree from Shandong Normal University. She has published numerous books and articles in her areas of research, which include comparative law, land law, contracts, torts, administrative remedies, dispute resolution, and bilingual education, and has received awards for her scholarship and teaching. She is a member of the China Law Society, a Council member of the Shandong Law Society, and a Council member of the Chinese Society of Comparative Law.

She was a Visiting Scholar last year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Law, and several years ago at the University of Iowa College of Law.

Legal Spanish Study Group resumes

A feature of our second week of our fall semester was yesterday’s launch of the Legal Spanish Study Group, an initiative of the Dean Rusk International Law Center at the University of Georgia School of Law.

Leading the lunchtime session were the Group’s  co-coordinators, Georgia Law 2Ls Matthew Poletti and Brian Griffin. Both are Spanish speakers who were Global Externs Overseas this past summer – Matt at Araoz & Rueda Abogados in Madrid, Spain, and Brian at PwC in Milan, Italy. (Brian also attended our Global Governance Summer School.) They continue a tradition begun by the Group’s founding coordinator, Pedro Dorado (JD’17/LLM’15). Professor Diane Marie Amann, Emily & Ernest Woodruff Chair in International Law and a Faculty Co-Director of the Center, will serve as the Group’s faculty advisor.

This will be the 2d consecutive year that this Group convenes, most timely given yesterday’s New York Times report on the entrenchment of Spanish in the United States – which has more Spanish speakers than Spain – and the world – where more countries have Spanish as the majority language than any other language.

In the words of Matt and Brian:

“In our ever-more interconnected world, and especially in today’s legal field, proficiency in a second language is a skill in high demand. It might even make the difference in landing your dream job. We invite all law students to join us in our endeavor to improve our Spanish language skills, develop a better understanding of the Hispano-American legal world, and prepare for a globalized legal practice.”

Many students accepted that invitation, promising great Study Group meetings each week throughout the semester.